Being thankful is a practice that most of the time isn’t automatic with people. We typically have to remind ourselves to take time to think about the amazing things that God has done for us and the many things that we should be thankful for. It is important to instill this practice into children, while they are still young, to help them develop a lifelong practice of thankfulness. Here are some ways you can teach children to be thankful.

  1. Pray together as a family and each of you thank God for something He has blessed you with.
  2. Play “show and tell.” Have each family member show and tell about something they are thankful for.
  3. Take time to write a thank you card to God.
  4. Take a day and have everyone in your house go without using something you are thankful for. This will help increase your gratitude even more.
  5. Read Bible verses together on thankfulness. (1 Thessalonians 5:18, Psalm 107:1, Ephesians 5:20, Psalm 106:1, 2 Corinthians 9:15)
  6. With your family, take turns telling each other why you are thankful for them.
  7. After dinner, talk with your family and make a list of things everyone is thankful for that God has done for them that day. Be sure to pray and thank God!
  8. Write the words “T-H-A-N-K Y-O-U” on a piece of paper for each person, with the words going down the side of the paper. Have each person make an acrostic with those letters, writing down things you are thankful for that start with each letter. To make it even longer, add “G-O-D.”

Do you have any favorite ways that you have taught children to be more thankful? Leave your ideas in the comment section!

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GJ Farmer is a husband, a dad, the founder of ChildrensMinistryBlog.com, and is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in Somerset, Kentucky. He has completed a Bachelor’s degree in Church Ministries and a Master’s degree in Children’s Ministry. He has also been fortunate to lead and teach groups at children’s ministry conferences and to have had some of his writing published. Apart from working with kids, he enjoys reading, performing magic tricks, playing video games, and University of Kentucky basketball.

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