appsRecently, research has found that children are moving from playing games on a computer to playing “free” games on mobile devices. To children’s ministry leaders and parents, this probably does not come as a shock since a majority of children have their own mobile devices these days.

A recent article from theguardian.com states that companies, such as London-based Mind Candy, have struggled to follow the trend from online to mobile. Despite having over 80 million registered children on their website, Mind Candy has found it difficult to convert those registrations into mobile users.

With the number of children using mobile devices continuing to rise, the question becomes, “Will we, in children’s ministry, capitalize on this trend before it changes to something else? If so, in what ways?”

I can see potential for curriculum companies to develop accompanying apps with games, quizzes, family devotionals, etc, as well as custom push updates to remind children to learn their memory verse, of an upcoming event, or to read their Bibles. For child check-in software providers to allow parents to check in their children through an app and have the name badges preprinted for the families upon arrival to the church. To provide preteen ministries private social networks for kids to connect with other kids in their churches during the week.

The potential is HUGE in this market, for children’s ministry.

How do you think this trend could impact children’s ministry? Leave your comments/thoughts below in the comment section or you can participate in the discussion at CMConnect.org, How Can We Better Use Mobile Devices in Children’s Ministry?

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GJ Farmer is a husband, a dad, the founder of ChildrensMinistryBlog.com, and is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in Somerset, Kentucky. He has completed a Bachelor’s degree in Church Ministries and a Master’s degree in Children’s Ministry. He has also been fortunate to lead and teach groups at children’s ministry conferences and to have had some of his writing published. Apart from working with kids, he enjoys reading, performing magic tricks, playing video games, and University of Kentucky basketball.

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