Tracts can be valuable tools for evangelism. They allow you to present the gospel to someone when you or the other person may not have a lot of time to spend together. Tracts also allow someone, who may not have a lot of experience sharing Jesus, to present the gospel to others in an easy to follow method.

We plan on using tracts at our Fall Festival, as a quick and easy way to make sure every person who attends has been presented with the gospel. As families enter our doors, they will be given a tract along with a pamphlet about our children’s ministry in a plastic bag that will be used to collect their goodies.

In order for tracts to be effective, they must contain a clear and biblical message of the gospel. Unfortunately, I have found that many tracts for children have the tendency to either focus on Heaven as being the primary goal for salvation, rather than a restored relationship with God, or they tend to not spend enough time talking about the seriousness of sin, both of which result in a misunderstanding of the gospel.

Here’s a brief video from Living Waters, in which Kirk Cameron and Ray Comfort talk about what every good tract MUST contain and a popular children’s tract that I highly recommend.

If you would like to find out more about the Albert Brainstein tract, click here.

What has been your experience with tracts? Leave your thoughts below!

 

Disclaimer: I have not been compensated in any way to promote this company. I simply LOVE using their resources and think you will too!

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GJ Farmer is a husband, a dad, the founder of ChildrensMinistryBlog.com, and is the Children’s Pastor at First Baptist Church in Somerset, Kentucky. He has completed a Bachelor’s degree in Church Ministries and a Master’s degree in Children’s Ministry. He has also been fortunate to lead and teach groups at children’s ministry conferences and to have had some of his writing published. Apart from working with kids, he enjoys reading, performing magic tricks, playing video games, and University of Kentucky basketball.

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